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Police unions have too much power. It’s time to hold them accountable.

  1. No more
    Police Union Contracts Blocking Accountability
  2. No more
    Rehiring Officers Fired for Misconduct
  3. No more
    Police Bill of
    Rights Laws
  4. No more
    Police Union Influence Over Police Budgets
  5. No more
    Police Unions Buying Political Power
  6. No more
    Negotiations without Community Representation

Across the country, police unions have written contracts and laws that make it almost impossible to hold police accountable. We reviewed police union contracts in nearly 600 cities and “Police Bill of Rights” laws in 20 states.

See how police unions have rigged the system in your community:

These 20 states have “Police Bill of Rights” laws granting special protections to officers who commit misconduct:

FIND ELECTED OFFICIALS IN YOUR STATE WHO HAVE RECEIVED DONATIONS FROM POLICE & CORRECTIONS UNIONS OR PRIVATE PRISON LOBBYISTS:

View Contributions Map

Cities Negotiating Contracts

Hundreds of cities negotiate new police union contracts each year. Here are some cities currently negotiating:

6 Ways Police Union Contracts Block Accountability

  1. Destroying Records Of Police Misconduct
  2. Tossing Out Misconduct Complaints
  3. Delaying Or Restricting Interrogations Of Officers
  4. Giving Officers Preferential Access To Evidence
  5. Restricting Disciplinary Consequences
  6. Requiring Communities Fund Misconduct
Research Basis
Icon of a paper shredder
In some cities, police union contracts require misconduct records to be destroyed.
Pie Chart
Police unions make it harder for cities to cut police funding or change the size of the force. Over 80% of the average police budget is comprised of personnel costs that are negotiated within police union contracts.
Hand on scales of justice
In some cities, contracts enable officers to appeal discipline or termination to a lawyer, called an arbitrator, who the police union usually helps select.
Icon of government building
Police unions spend millions each year to influence politicians — blocking efforts to hold the police accountable and rigging the system in favor of officers who commit misconduct.